Monday, January 26, 2009

Art Space Talk: Ariane Bartosh

Ariane Bartosh is a figurative painter with a background in interior design. Her earlier work involved candid photos of her friends that she would then compile and use as references for her paintings. Bartosh’s newer series involves ideas that are already drawn out. Bartosh describes her current process, “I pick a person in my life, then I find photos of objects, wallpaper, and furniture that remind me of them. Then I collage everything together with photos of the person I have taken specifically for the painting. After all that I paint.”.

Bartosh has stated that her earlier work was focused on social commentary about youth, specifically young women in our society. In a sense, her work explored the beauty and awkwardness during the transition between youth and adulthood. A time where freedom, independence and self expressions is highly valued. For this Bartosh examined her own experiences and observed the actions of her peers. These paintings reveal the chaotic process of coming into ones self possession.

Ariane Bartosh’s recent work is focused more on identity itself rather than the development of identity. She has stated that in each painting she is trying to show a person with their possessions and belonging in a way that they believe defines their personality. This is where her training as an interior designer influences her art.

Sara by Ariane Bartosh

Brian Sherwin: Ariane, I understand that you attended San Diego State University where you major in art with an emphasis in interior design and a minor in painting. Can you discuss your academic years? Did your studies have an impact on your development as an artist? Also, did you have any influential instructors during that time?

Ariane Bartosh: I always new I wanted to do something creative with my life. I feel like I was born to design, and like most designers I want to design everything! I started out as a painting major in college, I have always loved painting and the process but as time went on i found myself staying awake at night fantasizing about home designs. I literally could not sleep! I would get up and sketch out all these crazy plans. That's when I decided to switch to interior design.
I love finding interesting objects, furniture, and textiles and creating an awe inspiring space. I really strive to create interiors that are like works of art. But I never gave up my love of painting, my work as an interior designer has really influenced my new series of paintings that I am still working on.
Strangers, Friends, & Lovers by Ariane Bartosh

BS: Ariane, tell us about some of your works-- for example, 'The Party Never Ends', 'Strangers, Friends, & Lovers', and 'Sara'. What are the social implications of these works? Do you strive to convey a specific message concerning culture-- specifically youth culture in the United States?

AB: In my earlier works like "The Party Never Ends" and "Strangers, Friends and Lovers" was a social commentary about youth, specifically young women in our society. Exploring the beauty and awkwardness during the transition between youth and adulthood. A time where freedom, independence and self expressions is highly valued. Drawing upon my own experiences and the observation of my peers. Conveying the chaotic process of coming into ones self possession.

BS: Tell us more about the thoughts behind your work…

AB: My newer work which I am still evolving expands on the ideas of my later series but is directed towards a youth that is a little more grow up. Someone that has already found their self identity. "Sara" is my first example of this new series. In each painting I am trying to show a person with their possessions and belonging, which they believe defines their personality. This is where my training as an interior designer has really started to influence my work.
What do you do when nobody is watching? by Ariane Bartosh

BS: What about other influences. For example, are you influenced by any specific artists, art movements, or world events?

AB: When I was younger I was really influenced by fashion. I think I was mesmerized with the beauty of the models and the human figure. This is what drove me towards creating figurative work. My favorite artist is probably Eric Fischl, I also love the work of John Currin, Elizabeth Peyton. I just recently discovered the work of Mathhew Cerletty and I absolutely love it, some of it really similar to what I am trying to convey. I really feel that figurative painting has really had a come back in the last decade.

BS: Can you tell us about your process? Perhaps you can discuss some of the methods and techniques that you utilize?

AB: With my earlier work I would always go out with a camera at hand, taking candid photos of my friends then later compiling them and drawing ideas from their actions. But my newer series is very planed, I already have my whole series drawn out. I pick a person in my life, then I find photos of objects, wallpaper, and furniture that remind me of them. Then I collage everything together with photos of person I have taken specifically for the painting. After all that I paint.
Untold Anxieties of the Uncontrollable by Ariane Bartosh

BS: What about exhibits? Will you be involved with any upcoming exhibits?

AB: I'm not involved an any upcoming exhibits, I'm trying to get into grad school and have been really focused on that lately. But after I finish my current series I hope to start exhibiting.

BS: In your opinion, how is the internet opening doors for artists? Do you feel that the World Wide Web is changing the way we approach the art world in general?
AB: The Internet is definitely broadening peoples horizons about art. There is a plethora of inspirational images that are so accessible because of the web. I feel that blogs are especially influential. Not only does artists work become widely exposed and discussed by a large audience, but a new and larger generation of artists are emerging because there is so much out there that inspires!
Into the Ocean I Sank by Ariane Bartosh

BS: Finally is there anything else you would like to say about your art or the goals that you have?

AB: My ultimate goal is to really produce more! But there is so much I want to do! I have 15 paintings in my head waiting to come out, a whole line of furniture I have designed that needs to be created, a million interiors waiting to be thought up! I also own a vintage clothing store that I obsessively shop for! (www.duchessvintage.com something ha ha) There is so much to do I feel bad if I stop for a minute!

You can learn more about Ariane Bartosh by visiting her myartspace.com profile-- www.myartspace.com/arianebartosh. You can purchase art by Ariane Bartosh on the New York Art Exchange-- www.nyaxe.com/arianebartosh. You can read more of my interviews by visiting the following page-- www.myartspace.com/interviews.
Take care, Stay true,
Brian Sherwin
Senior Editor
myartspace.com
New York Art Exchange (NYAXE)

1 comment:

Josh Namm said...

You ARE famous! Cool!